Snail's Postcard Post

Washington, Some Years Ago

Continuing with Mike the Falcon’s collection, I thought we’d move up the coast to Washington.

IMG_8948Paradise Inn and the Mountain, Rainier Nat’l. Park

Built in 1916, Paradise Inn is now owned by the National Park Service, and continues to run as a hotel. It’s no longer open during the winter and spring though, so guests don’t get to ski on the roof.paradise-inn-at-mountIMG_8954IMG_8955

Postmark: Paradise Inn, July 8, 1936
Caption: A Rainier National Park bruin finds cafeteria service meets his desires best.
Would you like to join him?It is a perfect day and the mountain is glorious. Am spending two days here with the Osborns.
Love–
Lue.
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Any idea why there’s this second stamp with a much later date? Please comment!

The 1930 U.S. Census lists a Carrie L. Levens living in Los Angeles. She was 66 at the time (born in Michigan, 1864), and her “Relationship to Head of Household” was “Sister.” 

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Tacoma, The Gateway to Rainier National Park, Wn.IMG_8951

IMG_8963IMG_8964

(1917)

IMG_8946Mt. Tacoma and part of city. Tacoma, Wash.

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IMG_8957Hewitt Avenue at Night  Everett, Washington

This is probably my favorite postcard in the Falcon’s whole pack. You know I love night views, and this one is so romantically colored, looking more like a watercolor painting than a linen type photo. The street is wet, every light glows, and you can just sense the clouds moving. IMG_8958

This postcard seems to date somewhere between 1907 and 1915. Many of the old buildings seem to still be there.

Everett,_WA_-_1800_block_of_Hewitt,_south_side

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Tourist Steamer on Diablo Lake
Skaget (Skagit today), Washington
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Oct. 10/14
Traveling is great but it’s no fun living in a suit case. With best regards to all
Love from
Eva + FrankIMG_8971

In the new year, Miss Emma Piaggio must have gotten to see the Panama-Pacific Exhibition in her hometown!

…truly her hometown, as Emma was born in San Francisco in 1886, making her 28 when Eva and Frank’s postcard arrived. She died in 1978 and is buried in the Italian Cemetery in nearby Colma. (I learned this through Find A Grave.com.) I also found her mother’s obit in a 1903 San Francisco Call.The 1900 U.S. Census (listing Emma as age 14) suggests the Piaggios were a large family in San Francisco. 

When I research people that come to me through the past via postcard, I always wonder what they would make of a snail like me being able to find out about them through this thing called the internet.IMG_8959Manito Park, largest and most beautiful in Spokane. Washington.IMG_8961

Your letter and clipping at hand. Tell the Misses Otte many thanks for their pleasant thoughts. Did not take my camera–too much bother–post cards are less trouble. Only twice have I missed a camera. I took dinner with Mr. Glasgow today at The Spokane Club. He is a millionaire miller here. I may go over to Coeur D’Aliene  [sic.] to see the land lottery. You can address me at Minneapolis.
Howard 

According to the Spokane Mountaineers, “Mr. Glasgow” seems to have been one Sam Glasgow who arrived in Spokane, “then a mere village,” in 1882 at age 23. In 1889, he co-founded Centennial Flouring Mills. On August 4 of that year, a great fire spread through Spokane leaving many people without basic provisions. Fortunately, Mr. Glasgow’s company had just finished producing its first 100 barrels of flour the day before. The company donated it all to over 700 families, gaining Centennial Flouring early popularity. The company went on to build 11 mills around Spokane, and exported flour all over the world. IMG_8962According to a Reid-Schroeder family genealogy site, there was a Miss Cora J. Lillie born near Grand Rapids in Polkton, Michigan around 1879, making her about 30 when she received Howard’s postcard.
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IMG_8965Monroe Street Bridge and Falls, Spokane, Washington

The bridge today: Monroe_Street_Bridge_20070217IMG_8966

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This entry was published on December 10, 2014 at 11:15 pm. It’s filed under U.S.A. and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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