Snail's Postcard Post

Little Tokyo

Grandma Snail never cared much for travel. She’d say, “Here in Los Angeles, I can go anywhere in the world I want, and still sleep in my own bed.” I thought of Grandma Snail this afternoon when Mama Snail and I went to Japan, that is, to Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

We stopped at a shop with tea ware, stationary, embroidered pouches and all sorts of knick-knacks. Mama Snail recalled how, when she was a wee snail, she’d visit Little Tokyo shops like this with Grandma Snail, who’d give her a whole dollar to buy tiny toy animals. 

Rather than animals, I opted for postcards–the one above, and these below:IMG_7795“The Yasaka Tower, Kyoto” (Yasaka-no-to in Japanese, meaning “Yasaka Pagoda”)

Yasaka Tower is currently its natural wood color, no longer painted red. The tower’s neighborhood has maintained the feel of the old city, with the same traditional shops and narrow roads as in this postcard.IMG_4208(This photo is from Alex Fahey’s travel blog which has other great photos of Yasaka Tower and its surroundings.) 

The internet also yielded an even older postcard of Yasaka Tower–from 1910:383px-Yasaka1910But the tower is so much older than that. It was built in the year 589 by Imperial Prince Shotoku, and is said to have been inspired by a dream he had. Here’s Prince Shotoku on a yen bill:Taishi_10000JPY

My next postcard from Little Tokyo is of the Sanjo-Ohashi bridge in Kyoto:IMG_7797This bridge was built in 1950, so it must have been brand new when this postcard was printed. Apparently, various models of the Sanjo Ohashi bridge have stood at this point since at least the sixteenth century. Here’s what it looks like today:93540282_0ee977d671(From the travel blog The Wandering Stray Cat )IMG_7796Finally, in case someone challenges me to a sumo match, I’ll be ready:IMG_7798IMG_7799IMG_7800

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This entry was published on May 23, 2014 at 6:24 pm. It’s filed under Asia and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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