Snail's Postcard Post

Found!

In May, Mama Snail and her boyfriend Andrew visited California’s Lake Tahoe area. There they ventured into an antique shop, where Andrew thoughtfully picked out an eclectic clutch of postcards for me. But upon their return home at the beginning of this month, the postcards were nowhere to be found. Today Mama Snail rediscovered them, and so I’ve finally received my souvenir (completely unrelated to Tahoe, by the way).

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One of the United States’ early conservationists, George Bird Grinnell (1849-1938) named many of the features in what is now Glacier National Park, and so the park’s star glacier (which he first saw in 1885) is named for him. A specialist in zoology and Native American studies in the Northern Plains, George Bird Grinnell is most recognized for his public and legislative work to preserve American bison. PSM_V43_D611_George_Bird_Grinnellimage from: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/PSM_V43_D611_
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I’ve long wanted to visit Glacier National Park, which I’ve read is one of the most pristine exemplars of Montana’s sweeping beauty. I’m also keen to go because, due to human-induced climate change, the glaciers there are melting fast. The 2010 U.S. Geological Survey found that Grinnell Glacier lost almost 40% of its acreage between 1966 and 2005. Imagine this postcard–which seems to be from the ’60s (a young bear checking out a tourist’s car would not work as a quaint etching today)– with only about half the ice. glacier  image from: earthvisiontrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Grinnell_LoRes.jpg

For more postcards of Montana wilderness and wildlife, check out this post.

Now let’s go someplace that’s supposed to be warm. How about Greece? IMG_5932IMG_5933I can’t find any information about this incredible monastery. If you know, please comment!
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IMG_5935This seems to be a church at the base of the incredible Holy Meteora monastery (atop the cliffs). IMG_5936

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Captain Morgan’s sacking of Panama was not as successful as the pirates had hoped due to destruction by fires and several Spanish ships that escaped with booty.  Still, it took 175 mules for the buccaneers to convey their loot (along with an unfortunate number of black slaves and Spanish prisoners for ransom) back to the Atlantic. My first postcard from the Isthmus! 

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This entry was published on June 27, 2013 at 12:21 am. It’s filed under This Just In! and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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